A partnership with USACE to successfully maintain and operate key infrastructure projects that contribute to the economy, environment, safety, and quality of life for the 574 Federally recognized Native American Tribes.

About Us

Building relationships is the foundation to achieving that goal and the necessary first step in realizing integration of human values, attitudes, beliefs, perceptions and policies with modern communication and collaboration practices. The TNTCX is uniquely capable of fostering collaboration with indigenous people, both through our approach and the infrastructure we have established to that end.

Indigenous people are the original engineers to “work with nature” and continue this practice today. Recognizing their nature-based solutions expertise and integrating this knowledge into the NEWN framework is critical to successfully accomplishing Engineering with Nature across the country.

What is Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK)?

Traditional Ecological Knowledge, also called by other names including Indigenous Knowledge or Native Science, (hereafter, TEK) refers to the evolving knowledge acquired by indigenous and local peoples over hundreds or thousands of years through direct contact with the environment. 

In The News

  • N-EWN Goes to Washington: National Policy Forum on Nature-based Solutions

    N-EWN Goes to Washington: National Policy Forum on Nature-based Solutions

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – Leaders from public, private and governmental organizations met at the National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine on February 7-8, 2024 to discuss policy and development of nature-based solutions (NbS). The first National Policy Forum was held to provide opportunities for policymakers, regulatory bodies, and practitioners to discuss the necessary policy reforms…

  • Gulf Coast hurricane resilience: UF natural infrastructure research featured by NPR

    Gulf Coast hurricane resilience: UF natural infrastructure research featured by NPR

    Researchers from the University of Florida were featured in an article from NPR on Thursday, Feb. 15 titled Hurricane Idalia shows nature may provide the best shoreline protection. The article describes how the team encouraged the growth of oyster beds by building artificial reefs offshore with the goal of slowing storm surge and flooding. “We…

  • Duke University on new North Carolina Conservation Executive Order

    Duke University on new North Carolina Conservation Executive Order

    Originally posted by the Nicholas Institute for Energy, Environment & Sustainability, Duke University, via LinkedIn. View their page here. Duke University experts Lydia Olander and Katie Warnell joined North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper on stage Monday after he signed an executive order to protect and restore the state’s natural and working lands. Olander and Warnell have worked closely…

  • Pictures from the Policy Forum on Nature-based Solutions

    Pictures from the Policy Forum on Nature-based Solutions

    Last week, the Network for Engineering With Nature and the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine hosted the Policy Forum on Nature-based Solutions in Washington, D.C. Ahead of our forthcoming full press release, check out some of the photos from the event below, captured by attendees! Check out a partial recording of the event…

  • Christine Angelini featured in NPR interview: Sea otters are making a comeback in California – and they’re curbing erosion

    Christine Angelini featured in NPR interview: Sea otters are making a comeback in California – and they’re curbing erosion

    Sea otters in California have undergone a “stunning comeback” in population numbers since their near-extinction in the mid-20th century. These coastal mammals are famously adorable, but did you know they’re also good for ecosystem infrastructure? In a new story from NPR, University of Florida coastal ecologist Christine Angelini spoke about a restoration project in Monterey…

  • Partners featured in Washington Post: Natural infrastructure for rising seas

    Partners featured in Washington Post: Natural infrastructure for rising seas

    At Eagles Island in Wilmington, North Carolina, floats the historic Battleship North Carolina: a World War II museum right on the water. But as climate change causes sea levels to rise, this popular visitors’ spot could be at risk due to increasingly high tidal flooding. While multiple design and engineering firms suggested building walls around…

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